K-Junction Solar

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The K-Junction Solar Project is a proposed utility-backed solar project west of McCool Junction in York County.

OPPD is having conversations with the community, while conducting a technical analysis to determine alignment with our mission of providing affordable, reliable and sustainable energy to our customers.

If constructed, the solar facility would provide approximately 310 megawatts of low-cost solar power to Nebraskans. This would expand OPPD’s power generation assets to meet increasing demand and further support regional reliability and grid resiliency.

Power for approximately 59,000 average homes
Local impact of $160+ million in net economic benefits
Employment opportunities during construction, operation and maintenance


Perennial Public Power District would continue to serve local customers, while OPPD would collaborate with other utilities to deliver power to the energy grid. The project’s earliest anticipated commercial operating date would be in 2027.

York County can continue the transition to cleaner energy.

York County can improve the environment and bring in millions of dollars for roads, schools, and first responders by supporting reasonable regulations for safe solar development.

Protect private property rights

Landowners have the right to develop solar on their land. It’s time to support reasonable regulation for safe solar development.

York County can bring in $53.7 million in economic benefit to local businesses.

A recently commissioned economic study shows that the project would bring in:

  • $15.5 million net economic impact annually through the life of the project
  • $185 million net total impact during construction, $53.7 million of which goes directly to local businesses



Common Misconceptions

  • According to research, utility-scale solar projects have the same noise levels of normal conversation or hens clucking up to 100 feet away from the inverter.
  • According to research, utility-scale solar projects do not affect nearby temperatures outside the perimeter.
  • Road-use agreements ensure protection of public infrastructure and hold developers responsible for potential damage.
  • Reasonable regulations protect neighbors with visual screening requirements, like trees, bushes, or fencing.
  • Solar is a cost-effective tool for energy generation at a time of day when energy is needed most. It’s proven, reliable and increasingly efficient thanks to advancements in production and construction.
  • The OPPD Board of Directors has signed a letter of intent to transfer the project to a private developer in order to ensure the statutory nameplate capacity tax dollars benefit the community.

Current Project Status

Supporting reasonable regulations that protect the community while also allowing landowners to maintain their rights is key.

A recent survey showed 87% of York County residents say landowners should have the right to allow solar development on their land if they want it. York County residents do not believe it is the responsibility of the local government to decide what landowners can do with their property.  

A fair compromise on solar setbacks is possible with a 660-foot setback, about twice the size of a football field, from non-participating neighbors with homes and a 150-foot setback from non-participating properties without dwellings.

This compromise achieves strong regulation in response to community feedback while respecting landowner rights, ensuring local schools, businesses, and government receive millions of dollars in economic development and tax benefits.


This page will be updated with additional information and opportunities to get involved as they become available.

The K-Junction Solar Project is a proposed utility-backed solar project west of McCool Junction in York County.

OPPD is having conversations with the community, while conducting a technical analysis to determine alignment with our mission of providing affordable, reliable and sustainable energy to our customers.

If constructed, the solar facility would provide approximately 310 megawatts of low-cost solar power to Nebraskans. This would expand OPPD’s power generation assets to meet increasing demand and further support regional reliability and grid resiliency.

Power for approximately 59,000 average homes
Local impact of $160+ million in net economic benefits
Employment opportunities during construction, operation and maintenance


Perennial Public Power District would continue to serve local customers, while OPPD would collaborate with other utilities to deliver power to the energy grid. The project’s earliest anticipated commercial operating date would be in 2027.

York County can continue the transition to cleaner energy.

York County can improve the environment and bring in millions of dollars for roads, schools, and first responders by supporting reasonable regulations for safe solar development.

Protect private property rights

Landowners have the right to develop solar on their land. It’s time to support reasonable regulation for safe solar development.

York County can bring in $53.7 million in economic benefit to local businesses.

A recently commissioned economic study shows that the project would bring in:

  • $15.5 million net economic impact annually through the life of the project
  • $185 million net total impact during construction, $53.7 million of which goes directly to local businesses



Common Misconceptions

  • According to research, utility-scale solar projects have the same noise levels of normal conversation or hens clucking up to 100 feet away from the inverter.
  • According to research, utility-scale solar projects do not affect nearby temperatures outside the perimeter.
  • Road-use agreements ensure protection of public infrastructure and hold developers responsible for potential damage.
  • Reasonable regulations protect neighbors with visual screening requirements, like trees, bushes, or fencing.
  • Solar is a cost-effective tool for energy generation at a time of day when energy is needed most. It’s proven, reliable and increasingly efficient thanks to advancements in production and construction.
  • The OPPD Board of Directors has signed a letter of intent to transfer the project to a private developer in order to ensure the statutory nameplate capacity tax dollars benefit the community.

Current Project Status

Supporting reasonable regulations that protect the community while also allowing landowners to maintain their rights is key.

A recent survey showed 87% of York County residents say landowners should have the right to allow solar development on their land if they want it. York County residents do not believe it is the responsibility of the local government to decide what landowners can do with their property.  

A fair compromise on solar setbacks is possible with a 660-foot setback, about twice the size of a football field, from non-participating neighbors with homes and a 150-foot setback from non-participating properties without dwellings.

This compromise achieves strong regulation in response to community feedback while respecting landowner rights, ensuring local schools, businesses, and government receive millions of dollars in economic development and tax benefits.


This page will be updated with additional information and opportunities to get involved as they become available.

K-Junction Solar

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Page last updated: 10 Apr 2024, 10:53 AM